Tag Archives: baseball

Baseball Then and Now

For as long as I can remember, I have loved the game of baseball. I still do. I don’t just love the game play, but I love the strategy, the gamesmanship, the personal effect, the unwritten rules, and perhaps most of all, the measurement by which all eras can correlate with one another.

I watched last night as the San Francisco Giants punched their ticket to the World Series by ousting the St. Louis Cardinals in five wonderful games. (Yes, I watched the Bruins and the Patriots too. Sometimes technology is my friend.) During the series, and last night’s broadcast, history was made. Things that I love about the game like…SF Giants starting pitcher Madison Bumgarner joined Bob Gibson and Mike Mussina as the only pitchers ever to submit five consecutive playoff starts of at least seven innings with seven or fewer base-runners

Or perhaps it was the ties to history such as…the Giants advanced to the World Series by way of a walk-off home run for the first time since Bobby Thomson’s unforgettable ‘Shot Heard Round the World’ in 1951

Then there was the mention of Bumgarner and Carl Hubbell in the same sentence…Bumgarner is just the fourth Giant to toss at least seven innings in four straight postseason starts, the first since Carl Hubbell between 1933 and 1936

I know a lot of things are different about the game now than they were then. Then again, with each moment bigger than the last, a pitcher holds the ball while a batter waits. The battles are won and lost pitch by pitch. It’s a beautiful thing.

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Thank you Baseball

To Coach Hartwell and Coach Dodge:

This morning I woke wishing we still had games left to coach, or even tournament games left to organize. Excuses for me to be at Allard Park are easy to come by. Mostly though, I wanted to thank you both for welcoming me into your dugout. You two were selfless in regard to our pecking order and were very open minded regarding discussion, thought process, and decision making. I appreciate it very much. I enjoyed battling alongside you two over the past week as well as preparing in the weeks before, and yes, I miss it already. It was both a joy and a pleasure to be announced with you and the Goffstown team at Allard Park this week. The anthem still gives me goose bumps. I closed my eyes yesterday as we stood on the 3rd base line while the anthem played and I thought of how fortunate I was to be a part of the team and to represent my town. I sang the words silently to myself as the sun shone down, pondering the thousands of past baseball heroes who had been so lucky as me. Thank you guys. It was wonderful to pace the dirt floors of the Allard Park dugouts again, and to look up and down the bench at kids playing for their home town community spelled across their chests. Thank you.

Local Baseball Trivia ~ What town?

In 2012, during the NCAA Division II Baseball College World Series a player from this town hit the first home run of the tournament. Then, this year, 2014, during the NCAA Division III Baseball College World Series, a player from this same town hit the first home run of the tournament. What is the town?

 

Answer: Goffstown, NH

The Wide-Eyed Boy and The Game

This is a short story I wrote because even after all of my years in baseball, playing it, watching it, writing about it, coaching it, dreaming about it, and teaching it, I was genuinely inspired. The source of my inspiration doesn’t know about this story, and neither does anyone else, so I’m hoping everyone enjoys it.

I have a tendency to romanticize things here and there I suppose. And yes, I know that reactions and intensity sometimes overtake us when we face adversity and failure, and we show a side of us that might not be so pretty, perhaps because it exposes others directly to our hearts. The truth I see though is the thousands of times that we bounce back almost immediately, pulling ourselves to our feet, to love and compete again, for the love of the game. So, romanticized, or not, there is not much that’s more beautiful to me than the wide-eyed boy and the game. Inspired by #8 and the #9.

If you look really close and let your mind travel along memory’s checkpoints, the past reverses, flashing head-on towards the present and the visual collides with the picture in front of you. It’s the wide-eyed boy, full of wonderment, completely engulfed in joy, participating in a boys game, now in a grown man’s body. The names have changed, the neighborhood kids are gone, the dimensions have expanded, the style, the look now seem to matter, and the canvas on which this picture unfolds is viewed by many. Beneath it all though, is the boy. The boy who still cannot soak up enough of the game or the atmosphere found inside the lines separating the player from the spectator.

The sky is perfect blue. The lines, bases, home plate, pitching rubber and baseballs are bright white. The grass cut short, and symmetrically shaped, is green and beckons all to sample its run at perfection. The Stars and Stripes wave gently; perfectly against the blue backdrop. There’s no actual stage, but still it’s set, for the boys of summer.

Enter, the man, in body and mind he’s a man now. But in pure joy, and jittery excitement, he is, and always will be, a boy. Especially in this setting. There’s something that’s perfect about all of it. It all adds up. The pieces all fit. And, it’s as if all things have come together in this place at this time as they were meant to be.

The man may appear this way, or that way, but there’s more to him than meets the eye. He’d rather be in no other setting, he’s home right here, right now. And when this moment passes, if one were to ask, he’d most definitely fondly remember hours spent on an old field, less kept, working on his skills many years before. He’d probably agree to go to that former place now, and continue to work on his game.

Herein lies the beauty, not just the boy in the picture, but also, the picture itself. This is where baseball has that effect, linking all that was right, pure, and innocent with the golden years; linking directly to right now. A kids game being played by a big kid like all of his heroes did decades before. Over the years sand lots gave way to school fields or town fields, the quality of which were far less relevant than the time and effort spent in honing skills. Generations passed and kids are kept closer at hand, the outdoors simply becoming a place through which we must pass. But not in baseball. Baseball encompasses the outdoors, the fresh air, and the things that come with it. As kids in passing generations are outside less, enclosed in an imaginary box of constant pacification, baseball is outside and is just as wide open and grand as it was when kids took to the places they played a hundred years ago.

And so it is. The lines are the same. Baseballs sail by, spinning, bending, dropping, carrying, curving, all in the open spaces that transcend time. Just like they always have. The crack of the baseball against wood still tells the story of direction, quality of contact, and the speed in which the wooden tool was used. As it has been from era to era. Look closer to see that gaps are a mirage, closing quickly, the pawns shifting and moving in premeditated harmony. Distances appearing either closer or even farther depending on how these boys of summer manipulate the tools of the trade.

Then my wandering gaze catches the source of the encouragement loudly aimed at a teammate taking his turn at hitting a round ball with a round bat, squarely. It’s that same wide-eyed boy pulling for his fellow mate, his tone and intensity leave no clue as to his recent level of success or failure. For, with him, it’s not about him for more than any second or two at a time, but about the game. It’s about the game. It’s about the joy of competing in the same spaces between the lines as any player in history ever did. A smile is never far from his lips because it’s not work when you’re engulfed fully in your passion. A gleam in his eyes, like he’s getting away with something that must be wrong because it’s too much fun. It couldn’t be more right, this game, this symmetry, and this wild-eyed boy.

 

8 and 9

Goffstown in Baseball, and the NCAA Tournament

Yes, I have lived in Goffstown, NH for the better part of 20 years. I am quite proud of the sports teams in our small town (population of roughly 17,700), especially in baseball. New Boston, NH (population of roughly 5,300) is part of the Goffstown School District and is very much a part of our community.

This is just an update of some players from the Goffstown School District or Goffstown Baseball Districts playing college baseball this season. There are a few more players who have either missed this season due to injury or are playing Club Baseball in the NECBA for their respective college or university.

Goffstown’s Riley Palmer and the SNHU Penmen won the Northeast-10 Conference Tournament and earned the #1 seed in the NCAA DII East Regional which SNHU is also hosting. Palmer earned Second Team All-Conference Honors and leads the team with 9 HR’s, 91 Total Bases, and a .479 Slugging Percentage. He also tied the SNHU Single-Season HR mark with this, “Good Grief! That ball was hammered!…”  Baseball to host NCAA Regional

Goffstown’s Ryan Smith and St. John Fisher did win 31 games and their second straight ECAC Metro Conference Championship but did not earn an at large bid to the NCAA DIII Baseball Regional. Smith led the team in saves with 6 and struck out 24 batters in just 16 1/3 innings pitched. Baseball Crowned ECAC Metro Champs

Goffstown’s Adam Routhier and Franklin Pierce University did earn an at large bid to the NCAA DII Baseball Regional. FPU is making their 10th consecutive NCAA appearance. Routhier is hitting .323 with half of his base hits being the extra base variety in limited playing time thus far as a Freshman. No. 21 Baseball Named #2 Seed in NCAA Regional

Goffstown’s Jake Glauser and the University of Southern Maine Huskies are in the NCAA DIII Baseball Regionals. They lost their bid for a 3rd straight Little East Conference Title despite Glauser’s heroics but did earn an at large bid. Glauser is hitting .282, has played in every game this season and has scored 33 runs thus far. USM Receives NCAA Bid

Goffstown’s Connor Shaw and the UMass-Dartmouth squad had a feisty run in the Little East Tournament and won 21 games this season. They did not qualify for the NCAA’s this year, but Shaw is off to a fine start in his career having collected 77 career hits in 69 games and accounting for more than 80 total runs thus far.

New Boston’s Mike Bisceglia and Wheaton College won 27 games but lost in their Conference Tournament Finals. They did not get an NCAA bid this year. Bisceglia batted .302 on the season with an On Base Percentage of .417. He also went 3–1 with a 3.14 ERA in 21 appearances on the mound.

New Boston’s Nick Nalette finished his 4-year baseball career at Merchant Marine this season, averaging nearly an RBI per base hit over his career.

New Boston’s Tyler Barss and the URI Rams are wrapping up their season. It has been a tough season for the Rams, but Barss, a Freshman, has allowed just 18 hits in 22 2/3 innings pitched while also earning a save.